What are the symptoms of RSD?
How is it diagnosed?

Not all patients have all the signs or symptoms of RSD. The first indication of RSD is pain that is more severe than would be expected from the injury that caused it. Patients generally describe a severe burning pain in a region, change in the temperature of one hand or foot and sensitivity to even a light touch. Often times there is swelling, and the skin in the area affected by the RSD can change colors. As the RSD disease progresses, there tends to be increased pain and swelling. The skin may become affected to the point that even hair will not grow on it. A patient becomes unduly sensitive to trauma in other parts of the body. Even carefully done surgeries can cause the RSD to spread. A patient with RSD must take special precautions before having any surgery.

Unfortunately, there is no simple test to confirm the diagnosis of RSD. However, it is very important that the disease be diagnosed quickly. The medical literature is abundantly clear: Early treatment leads to better results.

Some days are better than others for RSD patients. The pain ebbs and flows in intensity, but at its worst it has been compared to the pain of a ruptured disc, or of childbirth. Some of our clients have told us they would gladly amputate their affected limb if it would make the RSD pain go away. But amputation would only increase the pain from RSD.

Have you been diagnosed with RSD/CRPS as a result of injury or medical treatment?   Learn more about your legal options.